• Women drink like our fathers and do not cook like our mothers: deconstructing leisure activities in rural-urban Kenya

    By Eileen Nchanji Being in Kenya for barely three months, I was still grasping with the different ways in which gender plays out in the office and country I will…

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  • Reaping the benefits of using certified bean seed

    Walking down Kwamagana town in Rwanda, we find Alexis Nzeyimana on a motorcycle by one of his plots. Nicknamed ‘Rukirigitafaranga’, meaning tickling money in Kinyarwanda, Alexis has three farm sites…

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  • Business Unusual

    I’ve already seen how small changes in eating habits can be life-changing. I’m passionate about working in nutrition. I do what I do because I know how it feels when everybody looks the other way. I was a “preemie” – a premature baby. Weighing a mere 1.08 kg and anaemic, the doctors gave me 72 hours to live. But I’m still here; against all the odds I survived,and now I want to be part of the solution. As a nutritionist, I cannot look the other way while women and children are dying ofanaemia and malnutrition on our watch. Worldwide, malnutrition is responsible for almost half of the deaths of children under the age of five. Some 90 percent of thoseoccur in 34 countries; 22 of which are in Africa. Although malnutrition has multiple causes, I strongly believe the root of theproblem in Africa is due to dysfunctional food systems that fail to provide the right nutrients in the right quantities in orderfor people of all ages to thrive. This has to change. Fortunately, nutrition has become accepted as a global priority – it even has its own Sustainable Development Goal (SDG). But if we’re going to meet SDG3 – for good health and well being – we’re going to need less business-as-usual, and more unusual business. First, we need to radically rethink the concept of food security, and focus on nutrition security as well. Having enoughcalories is not enough – we need better food production and distribution systems that ensure everyone has equal access tosafe, diverse, and nutrient-dense foods, produced with minimal damage to our environment. Yes, it’s a tall order. For example, daily consumption of specially bred, high-iron beans can prevent and even reverse anaemia in women and children. That ’s a quick, effective response to a condition that can blight their entire lives – entire nations.

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  • News update

    This year, the Pan-Africa Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) celebrates 20 years of better beans for Africa  For 20 years, PABRA has helped to breed more nutritious, resilient beans for Africa.  Stay tuned by following this hashtag #PABRA20  and find out more about our work and initiatives here: http://bit.ly/2olaOu4

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  • R&D helping Africa have special beans to fight anaemia

    Dr. Mercy Lung’aho, a nutritionist at CIAT and member of the Pan-African Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) network, talks to Scidev.net about high iron beans – and how they can…

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  • The Pan-African Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) wrapped up its joint steering committee planning workshop, Nairobi, Kenya earlier this month, January 20th – February 2nd

    The workshop brought together more than 100 participants from across Africa, to plan the next phase of their research activities. Novel approaches to leverage better beans for more people…

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  • The world without beans: opinion piece

    By Dr. Robin Buruchara, Director of the Pan-Africa Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) This opinion piece was first published by the Pan-African Media Alliance for Climate Change…

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  • The promise of beans in the fight against malnutrition

    The idea that agriculture must not only feed us enough, it must also feed us well, has gained much traction on the development and research agenda in recent years….

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